Tag Archives: Carter v. Canada

Media promotes baseless slippery slope claims

Stuart Chambers critiques the latest crop of slippery slope arguments against the expansion of eligibility for medical assistance in dying.

In a Nutshell II: Ontario Court Decision & MAiD

Jocelyn Downie describes the recent Ontario Superior Court of Justice decision in A.B. v. The Attorney General of Canada and the Attorney General for Ontario, which provides an interpretation of “reasonably foreseeable natural death” within the Canadian federal legislation on medical assistance in dying (MAiD).

Mental Illness and Access to Assisted Dying

Ryan Tanner responds to objections to allowing medical assistance in dying for persons suffering from mental illness as the sole underlying medical condition.

Assisted Dying: A History of Ethical Principles

Stuart Chambers describes the ethical principles that have shaped the historical debates surrounding medical assistance in dying in Canada.

Advance Request for Euthanasia?

Catherine Ferrier raises concerns about advance requests for medical assistance in dying.

Dignity, Politics, and Medical Assistance in Dying

Harry Critchley considers the meaning and role of dignity within debates on medical assistance in dying.

Incremental medical assistance in dying

Stuart Chambers comments on the incrementalism that characterizes the Liberal government’s legislation on medical assistance in dying.